Safety Consulting, Staffing, and Training Services

Effective, safety and health project management, available in real time, to elevate your safety culture.

Professional safety management reduces time intensive internal oversight while producing customized and effective deliverables. Address your immediate staffing needs with competent health and safety professionals for your projects or facilities.

Safety Consulting, Staffing, and Training Services

  • Decrease potential for accidents, incidents, and near-hit accidents to help protect your employees, keep your production moving, and reduce insurance premiums.
  • Optimize project staff by reducing challenges of managing safety in-house.
  • Ensure safety of workers through project management services tailored specifically to client’s projects, facilities, or hazards.
  • Save time using subject matter experts to initiate or create solutions to specific scenarios.

  • Increase compliance with regulatory agencies, including OSHA.

Project Support and Project Staffing

We assist with remote or on-site safety management support at your project or facility, including multi-week to multi-month facility shutdowns, maintenance turnarounds, or rotational work. We can assist with all phases of project support or address ongoing support needs.

Common examples of project support and staffing include the following:

  • Auditing and Inspections
  • Employee Safety Orientations
  • Hazard Assessment
  • Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) Development
  • Permitting
  • Project Initiation, Planning, Execution, Monitoring, Control, and Closure Deliverables

Project Support and Project Staffing

We assist with remote or on-site safety management support at your project or facility, including multi-week to multi-month facility shutdowns, maintenance turnarounds, or rotational work. We can assist with all phases of project support or address ongoing support needs.

Common examples of project support and staffing include the following:

  • Auditing and Inspections
  • Employee Safety Orientations
  • Hazard Assessment
  • Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) Development
  • Permitting
  • Project Initiation, Planning, Execution, Monitoring, Control, and Closure Deliverables

Safety and Health Training

We perform safety and health training to address a range of hazards and compliance requirements. Services can be performed at client locations or at our training facility in Nampa, Idaho. All courses are developed and delivered by a Certified Safety Professional (CSP). Training courses include the following:

OSHA General Industry Training

  • Forklift (Powered Industrial Trucks)
  • Hazard Communication
  • Hearing Conservation
  • Lockout/Tagout (Awareness and Authorized Employee)
  • Permit Required Confined Space (Awareness and Competent Person)
  • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
  • Portable Fire Extinguisher
  • Respiratory Protection
  • Scissor Lift or Snorkel Lift
  • Site Specific Safety Training including Emergency Action Plans

OSHA General Industry Toxic and Hazardous Substances Training

  • Asbestos Awareness
  • Benzene
  • Bloodborne Pathogens
  • Hydrogen Sulfide Training with Atmospheric Monitoring
  • Lead Awareness
  • Respirable Crystalline Silica
mask fit services

Regulatory Compliance and Written Programs

We develop organization-specific OSHA-required programs, including training. We also identify gaps in existing company programs and work towards compliance on most programs (some technical exceptions) outlined in OSHA’s 1910 for General Industry or 1926 for Construction.

Historical Injury Trending and Reduction Strategy Development​

We evaluate past injury trends, near-hit accidents, workers’ compensation costs (loss runs), OSHA 300 logs, current work practices, training, and current mitigation controls to develop a practical approach to limit future accidents and losses to your organization. We then develop recommendations that can include program development, injury management practices, engineering controls, administrative controls, or personal protective equipment to help eliminate future injuries.

You may be thinking, why not manage safety and OSHA compliance in-house?

Investing in safety can yield significant returns. Various studies have shown that for every $1 invested in workplace safety, a return between $2 –$6 will occur.

Increased accidents can lead to significant lost production time. Injured workers miss days of work, require ongoing medical treatment, and are often restricted in job duties by medical professionals.

Increased accidents result in a higher Experience Modification Rate (EMR) and increased insurance costs. The EMR is an indicator of how safe a company is operating and is used to calculate premium costs. The EMR is also a frequently used metric to separate safe companies and less safe companies from performing work for clients. Once an EMR is elevated to show a firm is unsafe in work practices, loss of work contracts is not unusual.

Workplace Injuries by State

Injuries can have a significant impact on the well-being and safety of workers across different states. Here are some key statistics regarding workplace injuries in the U.S.:

  • Vermont has the highest rate of non-fatal workplace injuries, with 2,896.54 injuries per 100,000 workers, attributed to its manufacturing and agriculture industries

  • Maine follows closely with a rate of 2,811.11 injuries per 100,000 workers

  • Nevada ranks third with a rate of 2,308.39 injuries per 100,000 workers, driven by its tourism industry and hazardous mining sector.

  • Wyoming has the highest rate of workplace fatalities, with 13 deaths per 100,000 workers, although the actual number is relatively low due to its small population.

  • Alaska follows closely with a rate of 10.7 fatal injuries per 100,000 workers, influenced by rugged terrain and remote locations.

  • South Dakota ranks third with a rate of 7.8 deaths per 100,000 workers, while North Dakota closely follows in fourth place with a rate of 7.4.

Idaho, like other states, faces its own challenges regarding workplace injuries and fatalities. Here are some statistics on Idaho workplace injuries:

  • The Idaho Industrial Commission receives approximately 35,000 reports of workers injured on the job each year.

  • Around 35 of these incidents result in fatalities annually.

  • In 2021, there were 30 fatal occupational injuries in Idaho, a decrease from the previous year’s 32 fatalities.

  • This decline is encouraging, considering the highest number of fatalities in 2018 was 45 deaths.

Key industries with high incidence rates and total injuries in Idaho include:

  • Manufacturing: 1,876 injuries in 2021, with an incidence rate of 4.1 per 200,000 working hours.
  • Construction: 430 injuries with an incidence rate of 4.0.

  • Transportation and warehousing: 1,297 injuries, representing the highest incidence rate at 9.1 per 200,000 working hours.

These industries play vital roles in Idaho’s economy, but the high number of injuries underscores the importance of implementing robust safety protocols.

Occupational Fatalities by Year

Unfortunately, thousands of workers die on the job each year. In 2021, there were more than 5,000 fatal workplace injuries, representing an increase of nearly 9% year over year. The occupational fatality rate in 2021 stood at 3.6, marking the highest annual rate since 2016. A work-related injury claimed a worker’s life approximately every 101 minutes throughout 2021.

Here are some additional statistics from 2021 provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics:

  • The fatal injury rate in construction and extraction occupations decreased by 2.6% from 2020 to 2021, though 951 fatalities were still recorded in 2021.
  • Exposure to harmful substances or environments resulted in the highest number of fatalities in 2021 at 798 deaths, an increase of 18.8% from the previous year.
  • Falls, slips, and trips in construction and extraction occupations accounted for 370 fatalities in 2021, a 7.2% increase compared to 2020.

These alarming statistics highlight the need for industrial hygiene services to prevent fatal workplace injuries. By prioritizing thorough exposure assessments, hazard control measures, and strict safety protocols, organizations can effectively protect their workforce and foster a safer work environment.

10 Most Frequently Cited OSHA Standards

To help employers identify and address commonly cited safety standards, here are the top 10 most frequently cited standards identified by federal OSHA during worksite inspections. It is crucial to prioritize the prevention of avoidable injuries, illnesses, and fatalities in the workplace, many of which can be mitigated through adherence to these frequently cited standards.

  1. Fall Protection (29 CFR 1926.501) – This standard addresses general requirements for fall protection in the construction industry, aiming to prevent falls from elevated surfaces.
  2. Hazard Communication (29 CFR 1910.1200) – This standard ensures proper labeling, communication, and handling of hazardous chemicals in the workplace, promoting worker safety.
  3. Respiratory Protection (29 CFR 1910.134) – This standard focuses on protecting workers from respiratory hazards by implementing effective respiratory protection programs.
  4. Ladders (29 CFR 1926.1053) – This standard provides guidelines for the safe use of ladders in construction, reducing the risk of ladder-related accidents.
  5. Scaffolding (29 CFR 1926.451) – This standard outlines safety requirements for the proper construction, use, and inspection of scaffolding systems, preventing scaffold-related incidents.
  6. Control of Hazardous Energy (lockout/tagout), general industry (29 CFR 1910.147) – This standard aims to prevent the unexpected startup of machinery or equipment during maintenance or servicing by implementing proper lockout/tagout procedures.
  7. Powered Industrial Trucks (29 CFR 1910.178) – This standard sets forth safety regulations for the operation of powered industrial trucks, reducing the risk of accidents involving forklifts and other material handling equipment.
  8. Fall Protection Training (29 CFR 1926.503) – This standard emphasizes the importance of training workers on fall protection systems, procedures, and equipment, promoting safe practices in the construction industry.
  9. Eye and Face Protection (29 CFR 1926.102) – This standard requires the use of appropriate eye and face protection in construction activities where potential hazards may exist, safeguarding workers’ eyes and faces.
  10. Machinery and Machine Guarding (29 CFR 1910.212) – This standard focuses on machine guarding to prevent contact with hazardous moving parts and reduce the risk of injuries in the general industry.

These frequently-cited OSHA standards highlight areas where adherence to safety regulations and the implementation of industrial hygiene practices can help prevent workplace injuries and ensure the well-being of workers.

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